Overcoming Negative Thinking

During stressful moments in life, remember to stop and ask yourself, “Where am I?”

This will help you keep a perspective on things and prevent you from sliding further down the trail of negative thinking.

You will be more easily able come to your senses, as you realize that the spiraling effect of negative thinking will only lead to morbid thoughts and dysfunction.

Furthermore, by staying focused on the higher purpose of life, you will be able to transcend the bitterness and suffering of the moment and stay with joy.

Life is too precious to waste or shorten by being depressed and sad.

Where Are You?: Based on the Teachings of Rabbi Nachman of Breslov and of His Student Rabbi Nossan of Breslov, by Mohorosh HaKodesh Breslov

Inner Strength

Develop a thick skin to all the inevitable hurtful remarks and stinging comments that people are prone to say. Inhibit your natural tendency to cower from every insult, real or imagined, by laughing it off as one big joke. Develop inner strength by not taking the snide comments of others so seriously and stop being so intimidated by people around you no matter how loud their bark.

You must make the conscious effort to stop placing your faith in people and start placing your faith exclusively in G-d.

Don’t Take It Personally: Based on the Teachings of Rabbi Nachman of Breslov and of His Student Rabbi Nossan of Breslov, by Mohorosh HaKodesh Breslov

Pessimism

Our ultimate purpose in this world is to come close to G-d, which is measured by our ability to maintain a continuous level of joy and contentment. The secret behind achieving and sustaining joy is not to lose perspective on life, by asking, “Where am I?” This technique is particularly important since most of us are prone to pessimism.

The minute something goes wrong in life and we’re faced with a problem or dilemma, we lose heart and begin to view our whole future in a negative light. We begin to panic and our imaginations run wild with thoughts of doom and gloom.

You must train yourself to nip the cycle of negative thinking in the bud, before it takes root in your mind and makes you depressed.

Where Are You?: Based on the Teachings of Rabbi Nachman of Breslov and of His Student Rabbi Nossan of Breslov, by Mohorosh HaKodesh Breslov

Coming To Terms With Reality

A person suffering from unrealistic modes of perception imagines that other people are acting against him. He repeats these thoughts over and over until he is convinced of it. Then he is possessed by his fantasy; his nerves are frazzled,  he cannot relax, and he eats himself alive.

He doesn’t have the peace of mind to discipline his thoughts and maintain a healthy, spiritual regimen of learning Torah, praying to G’d, and carrying out G’d’s commandments joyfully.

Instead, he is ruled by fear and rendered incapable by tension. He is moody and angry, and he indulges in bitter fantasies of how he will  revenge himself.

The people he is so worked up about may not have had any intention to hurt him; they may hardly be aware of him. And all the negative thoughts, the nerves, and the fantasies are baseless.

Come to terms with what your situation really is.

Illusions: Based on the Teachings of Rabbi Nachman of Breslov and of His Student Rabbi Nossan of Breslov, by Mohorosh HaKodesh Breslov

 

The Futility of Worldly Desires

The Yetzer HaRa ,evil inclination, is like a prankster running through a crowd showing his tightly-closed hand. No one knows what he is holding. He goes up to each one and asks, “What do you suppose I have in my hand?”

Each one imagines that the closed hand contains just what he desires most. They all hurry and run after the prankster. Then, when he has tricked them all into following him, he opens his hand. It is completely empty.

The same is true of the evil inclination. He fools the world, tricking it into following him. All men think that his hand contains what they desire. In the end, he opens his hand. There is nothing in it and no desire is ever fulfilled.

Worldly pleasures are like sunbeams in a dark room. They may actually seem solid, but he who tries to grasp a sunbeam finds nothing in his hand. The same is true of all worldly desires.

Rebbe Nachman, Sichot HaRan #6